French Word Order: From Basic Sentences to Writing Laws - FrenchPod101.com Blog (2023)

Do you ever get this feeling when speaking French? You have all the words you need to make the perfect sentence, but they just don’t fit together. This is what happens when you’re not comfortable with the word order and need to learn about the specifics of the correct French sentence structures.

It may seem confusing at first, but bear with me for a moment and I trust that you’ll find it to be quite simple. Except for a few tricky exceptions, the structures are always the same and are often very similar to English. With all the tips and tricks from this article and a bit of practice, it will come naturally in no time!

In this guide, we’ll explain everything you need to know about the French sentence structure, from basic sentences for beginners to impressive complex statements for sophisticated talkers.

French Word Order: From Basic Sentences to Writing Laws - FrenchPod101.com Blog (2)Table of Contents

  1. Ordering Words in French
  2. Simple Sentences with Subject, Verb, and Object
  3. How to Build Complex Sentences
  4. Asking Questions
  5. Negative Sentences
  6. Practical Cases
  7. Le Mot De La Fin

1. Ordering Words in French

Rule #1: French is SVO

Like many other languages throughout the world, French is what we call an SVO language. This means that the default word order is: Subject Verb Object.

  • {Je mange une pomme.} (“I eat an apple.”)

Rule #2: Don’t Skip the Subject

And unlike similarly rooted languages, such as Spanish or Italian, we don’t usually drop the subject of the sentence, even when it’s a pronoun.

  • I speak French.
  • (Yo) hablo Frances. (Spanish)
  • (Io) parlo Francese. (Italian)
  • Je parle Français.

Rule #3: Rules are Meant to be Broken

These are mainly the French word order rules of simple declarative sentences, but as soon as we enter imperative, interrogative, or negative sentences territory, it gets a bit wilder. I mean…it’s French we’re talking about.

And one more thing: Master Yoda is allowed to use OSV sentences and still sound cool, but it’s forbidden to the rest of us.

Le Français je parle. (“French I speak.”)

2. Simple Sentences with Subject, Verb, and Object

In the following sections, we’ll work with the most common type of sentences: declaratives.

A declarative sentence is used to make a statement. It declares or states something, and ends with a period. We can’t use declarative sentences to ask questions or give orders.

Let’s get back to our basic declarative sentence: Je parle Français. (“I speak French.”)

In this sentence, I’m stating that I speak French.

Like we mentioned before, there are mainly two things you need to know about declarative sentences and their basic word order in French:

  1. The word order is Subject + Verb + Object.
  2. We don’t drop the subject, even when it’s a pronoun.

To these basic rules, I would also add:

  1. Verbs are conjugated. Their ending depends on the subject.
  • Ils parlent Français. (“They speak French.”)
  • Nous parlons Français. (“We speak French.”)
    → You can learn more about conjugation in our Complete Guide on French Conjugation. It’s freely available on FrenchPod101.com.
  1. Objects must agree with the subject. Their ending also varies.
  • Il est Américain. (“He is American.”)
  • Elle est Américaine. (“She is American.”)

/! The main exception to the S+V+O rule is the imperative mood, where the structure becomes: V+O.

  • Vous parlez Français. (“You speak French.”) → Parlez Français. (“Speak French.”)
  • Nous mangeons des pommes. (“We eat apples.”) → Mangeons des pommes. (“Let’s eat apples.”)

Elle mange des pommes. (“She eats apples.”)

(Video) 520 French Words for Everyday Life - Basic Vocabulary #26

3. How to Build Complex Sentences

Now that we have the basics covered, it’s time to add more ingredients into the mix and spice it up with adverbs, adjectives, and pronouns to gradually make our sentence more exciting!

1 – Adding Adjectives:

Adjectives describe nouns to make them more interesting. Let’s see where to place them in a sentence.

According to French word order, adjectives usually go AFTER the noun they describe.

  • Une pomme verte (“A green apple”)

However, some of the most common adjectives go BEFORE the noun.

  • Une grosse pomme (“A big apple”)

Put in a sentence, it looks like this:

  • Il mange une pomme verte. (“He’s eating a green apple.”)

2 – Adding Adverbs:

Adverbs work together with and describe verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs to modify their meaning or make a sentence more precise.

When the adverb modifies a verb, it usually comes AFTER this verb. The word order is: S + V + Adv.

  • Je parle lentement. (“I speak slowly.”)

Then, if we have an object, it would be: S + V + O + Adv.

  • Je parle Français couramment. (“I speak French fluently.”)

When the adverb modifies an adverb or adjective, it usually comes AFTER the verb and BEFORE the adverb or adjective. The word order is: S + V + Adv + Adv.

  • Je parle très lentement. (“I speak very slowly.”)

When we get to this level of complexity, things start becoming a bit more flexible.

For instance, both sentences are correct:

  • Je parle Français couramment. (“I speak French fluently.”)
  • Je parle couramment Français. (“I speak French fluently.”)

However, it comes with exceptions, such as the very common bien (“well”) which is placed BEFORE the object.

  • Je parle bien Français. (“I speak French well.”)
  • Je parle vraiment bien Français. (“I speak French very well.”)
  • Je parle Français bien.

Not too confused with the colors, are you?

3 – Adding Pronouns

Brace yourself, this is where French language word order gets tough. Understanding the word order of pronouns in French isn’t always a walk in the park, and we’ll really just scratch the surface here.

Subject pronouns don’t move:

  • Nicolas mange une pomme. (“Nicolas eats an apple.”)
  • Il mange une pomme. (“He eats an apple.”)

Same thing for stressed pronouns:

  • Il mange une pomme avec ses amis. (“He eats an apple with his friends.”)
  • Il mange une pomme avec eux. (“He eats an apple with them.”)

However, direct and indirect pronouns are not as well-behaved.

(Video) 100 French Words for Everyday Life - Basic Vocabulary #5

  • Nicolas donne une pomme. (“He gives an apple.”)
  • Nicolas la donne. (“He gives it.”)
  • Il donne une pomme à ses amis. (“He gives an apple to his friends.”)
  • Il leur donne une pomme. (“He gives them an apple.”)
  • Il la leur donne. (“He gives it to them.”)

And what happens when we put everything together?

  • Je leur parle Français très lentement. (“I speak French with them very slowly.”)
  • Il leur donne gentiment une pomme verte. (“He gently gives them a green apple.”)

4 – Adding Prepositions

Prepositions are words that usually precede a noun or pronoun and express a relationship to another element of the sentence. Prepositional phrases often answer questions such as:

  • Where? Il mange une pomme dans la cuisine. (“He eats an apple in the kitchen.”)
  • When? Il mange une pomme après le dîner. (“He eats an apple after dinner.”)
  • How?
    • Il mange une pomme avec eux. (“He eats an apple with them.”)
    • Il mange une pomme sans se presser. (“He eats an apple without rushing.”)
    • Il mange une pomme avec soin. (“He eats an apple with care.”)

Prepositions can be placed BEFORE or AFTER the verb. In some cases, you can freely choose, and in other situations, only one option will make sense.

  • Après le dîner, je mange une pomme. (“After dinner, I eat an apple.”)
  • Je mange une pomme après le dîner. (“I eat an apple after dinner.”)
  • Il mange une pomme sans se presser. (“He eats an apple without rushing.”)
  • Sans se presser, il mange une pomme. (“Without rushing, he eats an apple.”)

In these two examples, both versions are correct.

But sometimes, you need to know the verb for the preposition to be relevant:

  • Je rentre à la maison. (“I go back home.”)

You would not say “Home, I go back,” and it would sound equally awkward in French.

  • Je donne une pomme à mon ami. (“I give an apple to my friend.”)

Similarly, it wouldn’t make sense to mention the recipient before the action is stated.

To combine prepositions, you can simply apply the same logic when choosing where to place them:

  • Après le dîner, je rentre à la maison sans me presser. (“After dinner, I go back home without rushing.”)
  • Sans me presser, je mange une pomme avec eux dans la cuisine. (“Without rushing, I eat an apple with them in the kitchen.”)


These are not the words I ordered!

4. Asking Questions

The word order in French questions isn’t always SVO.

Questions can take several different forms in French, depending on whether you’re talking or writing, as well as how formal you want to be.

Let’s go back to our apple-eating example: Tu manges une pomme.

Here’s how to say: “Do you eat an apple?”

1. Tu manges une pomme ? (SVO)

2. Est-ce que tu manges une pomme ? (Est-ce que + SVO)

3. Mangestu une pomme ? (VSO)

Now I guess the last one is confusing: Why do we suddenly invert the subject and verb?

(Video) 120 French Words for Everyday Life - Basic Vocabulary #6

This form is used only in writing or in very formal speech. Among friends, with random strangers, or in most business settings, you would stick to one of the first two options. I’d say both are equally common.

Now, what if we add some interrogative pronouns and adverbs?

Let’s see how to use words like: Quand (“When”), Qui (“Who”), Comment (“How”), (“Where?”).

“Where do you eat?”

1. Tu manges ?

2. est-ce que tu manges ?

3. mangestu ?

“When do you eat?”

1. Tu manges quand ?

2. Quand est-ce que tu manges ?

3. Quand mangestu ?

5. Negative Sentences

Luckily, this is the last case, because I’m seriously running out of colors!

In this section, we’ll have a look at the word order in negative sentences.

Negative structures are placed around the verb and before the preposition or object.

  • Je ne mange pas de pommes. (“I don’t eat an apple.”)
  • Je ne mange pas dans la cuisine. (“I don’t eat in the kitchen.”)
  • Je ne mange pas vite. (“I don’t eat fast.”)

The same thing goes for other negative structures:

  • Je ne mange plus dans la cuisine. (“I don’t eat in the kitchen anymore.”)
  • Je ne mange jamais dans la cuisine. (“I never eat in the kitchen.”)

That’s how I learned negative sentences!

6. Practical Cases

Now, it’s time to practice everything we’ve been learning today! We’ll take it slow and do it step-by-step. At any time, feel free to go back through the article if you’re having doubts.

(Video) 600 French Words for Everyday Life - Basic Vocabulary #30

Try to come up with the French translations for these sentences. You can use a conjugation table if you’re not sure how to deal with parler (“to speak”).

1. “We speak.” – _________________

2. “We speak French.” – _________________

3. “We speak French slowly.” – _________________

4. “We speak French slowly with her.” – _________________

5. “We speak with her in the kitchen.” – _________________

6. “After dinner, we speak with her in the kitchen.” – _________________

7. “We never speak with her in the kitchen.” – _________________

8. “Do you speak with her in the kitchen?” – _________________


“Where do I put these verbs again?”

“Where do I put these verbs again?”

[SPOILER] And here are the translations:

  1. “We speak.” – Nous parlons
  2. “We speak French.” – Nous parlons Français.
  3. “We speak French slowly.” – Nous parlons Français lentement.
  4. “We speak French slowly with her.” – Nous parlons Français lentement avec elle.
  5. “We speak with her in the kitchen.” – Nous parlons Français avec elle dans la cuisine.
  6. “After dinner, we speak with her in the kitchen.” – Après dîner, nous parlons avec dans la cuisine.
  7. “We never speak with her in the kitchen.” – Nous ne parlons jamais avec elle dans la cuisine.
  8. “Do you speak with her in the kitchen?” – Est-ce que tu parles avec elle dans la cuisine ?

7. Le Mot De La Fin

In this guide, you’ve learned a lot about French word order and the correct French sentence structures, from the basics to the most advanced parts such as French pronoun order.

Did we forget any important structure you would like to learn about? Do you feel ready to assemble ambitious sentences, using everything you’ve learned today?

As we’ve seen with the exercises, a good way to practice French word order is to start easy and slowly build up to complex sentences, one piece at a time.

Make sure to explore FrenchPod101.com, as we have plenty of free resources for you to practice your grammar and learn new words. Our vocabulary lists are also a great way to review the words and learn their pronunciation.
Remember that you can also use our Premium PLUS service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching. Practice talking about word order in French with your private teacher so they can give you personalized feedback and advice, and help you with the pronunciation.

French Word Order: From Basic Sentences to Writing Laws - FrenchPod101.com Blog (10)

(Video) Learn French in 25 Minutes - ALL the Basics You Need

About the Author: Born and bred in the rainy north of France, Cyril Danon has been bouncing off various jobs before he left everything behind to wander around the wonders of the World. Now, after quenching his wanderlust for the last few years, he’s eager to share his passion for languages.

FAQs

What is the basic word order of French? ›

Rule #1: French is SVO

Like many other languages throughout the world, French is what we call an SVO language. This means that the default word order is: Subject – Verb – Object.

How are French sentences organized? ›

In French, this is SVO - Subject + Verb + Object. As for most Romance languages - and, indeed, English - the subject (who is doing the action?) generally comes at the beginning of the sentence. There follows the verb, and then the direct object (what is he/she doing?).

What are some French sentence starters? ›

10 Simple French Sentences to Get Started with Basic Conversation
  • Comment vous appelez-vous? (What's your name?)
  • Enchanté(e)! ...
  • Je viens de… (I'm from…)
  • J'habite à… (I live in…)
  • Qu'est-ce que vous faites? (What is your profession?)
12 Apr 2022

What are 10 French words? ›

Learn Some Common French Words
  • Bonjour = Hello, Good morning.
  • Au revoir = Goodbye.
  • Oui = Yes.
  • Non = No.
  • Merci = Thank you.
  • Merci beaucoup = Thank you very much.
  • Fille = Girl.
  • Garçon = Boy.

What is the basic word order in a sentence? ›

The standard order of words in an English sentence is subject + verb + object. While this sounds simple, it may be difficult to identify the subject(s), verb(s), and object(s), depending on the structure and complexity of the sentence.

How can I learn French sentences fast? ›

10 tips to learn French fast
  1. Watch films. Watching films in French with French subtitles is one of the best ways to learn. ...
  2. Learn with songs. ...
  3. Read. ...
  4. Find a partner. ...
  5. Don't be scared to try and make mistakes. ...
  6. Listen! ...
  7. Practice. ...
  8. Sign up for an intensive course.
12 Aug 2016

What are sentence structures? ›

Sentence structure is how the basic grammatical elements (a subject, predicate, and sometimes direct or indirect objects) of a sentence are put together. The rules for how a sentence is constructed are simple but firm. These include the necessity for a subject, predicate, and object (in that order) in every sentence.

How do you start a basic conversation in French? ›

1. Basic French conversation: Greetings and first questions
  1. Quoi de neuf ? = What's new? What's up?
  2. Tu fais quoi dans la vie ? = What do you do for a living?
  3. Tu viens d'où ? = Where are you from?
  4. Comment tu t'appelles ? = What's your name?
  5. C'est quoi ton nom ? = What's your name? (informal, everyday spoken French)
22 Jun 2021

What are the 100 most common words in French? ›

100 most frequently used French words
  • le (det.) the; (pron.) him, her, it, them.
  • de (det.) some, any; (prep.) of, from.
  • un (det.) a, an; (adj., pron.) one.
  • à (prep.) to, at, in.
  • être (verb) to be; (noun [m. ]) being.
  • et (conj.) and.
  • en (prep.) in, by; (adv., pron.)
  • avoir (verb) to have; (noun [m. ]) assets.

What are some common French sentences? ›

Let's dig in!
  • Bonjour. = Good morning. ...
  • Bonne après-midi. = Good afternoon. ...
  • Je m'appelle Mondly. = My name is Mondly. ...
  • Je suis ravi de vous rencontrer. = I'm pleased to meet you. ...
  • Comment ça va ? = How are you? ...
  • Bien, merci. Et vous-même ? ...
  • J'aimerais une bière. = I'd like a beer. ...
  • Je suis désolé. = I'm sorry.

What is the most beautiful French word? ›

15 Most Beautiful Words in French
  • Douceur.
  • Feuilleter.
  • Onirique.
  • Flâner.
  • Chuchoter.
  • Rêvasser.
  • Éphémère.
  • Émerveiller.
3 May 2022

What is the easiest French word? ›

Basic French words at a glance

Bonjour. Hello. Merci. Thank you. Merci beaucoup.

What is the most difficult French word? ›

Serrurerie

Brace yourself: The hardest French word to pronounce is the word for locksmith – “serrurerie“.

How can I practice French by myself? ›

Get to know French grammar

Study with a French grammar book. Join an online program, either an application or a learning website and make grammar fun. Enlist a tutor for grammar lessons (try to find a native) Watch online grammar videos on useful topics to bring learning to life.

Can I learn French in 3 months? ›

While you certainly won't master it in three months, especially if you can only put a few hours a week into it, you can make sure to be more efficient by following an initial plan of action. Let's take a look at what you should do in the first hour, first day, first week and first month of learning French.

Is basic French easy to learn? ›

French is relatively easy to learn but it does take some time and effort. As French is closely related to English, I have to agree with the Foreign Language Institute that says that French belongs to the easiest group of languages to learn for English speakers. Having so much common vocabulary helps a lot!

What is the arrangement of words in a sentence? ›

syntax, the arrangement of words in sentences, clauses, and phrases, and the study of the formation of sentences and the relationship of their component parts.

What are 10 examples of command sentences? ›

In the examples of imperative sentences here, you'll note that each line is issuing a command of some sort:
  • Pass the salt.
  • Move out of my way!
  • Shut the front door.
  • Find my leather jacket.
  • Be there at five.
  • Clean your room.
  • Complete these by tomorrow.
  • Consider the red dress.
5 Sept 2016

What is word order give example? ›

A sentence's standard word order is Subject + Verb + Object (SVO). Remember, the subject is what a sentence is about; so, it comes first. For example: The dog (subject) + eats (verb) + popcorn (object).

How many words do you need to be fluent in French? ›

It is estimated that you have to learn 5000 words to be fluent in French. Be selective and learn the 5000 most used words in French! Think about it. Some words are more valuable than others.

Can I learn to speak French in one month? ›

To learn French in 1 month, you have to take intensive courses (at least 3 to 4 hours a day). You can try at the Alliance française in your country but the best would be to take these intensive courses in France or in a French speaking country (Alliance Française also propose such courses).

What are the 4 rules for adjectives in French? ›

When you use an adjective it must agree with the noun it is describing in both gender – masculine or feminine – and number – singular or plural. This means that French adjectives can have up to four different forms: masculine singular; feminine singular; masculine plural; and feminine plural.

What order do French adjectives go in? ›

French adjectives usually go AFTER the noun they are describing. French adjectives describing colours, shapes or nationalities always go AFTER the noun. Some very common French adjectives usually come BEFORE the noun. une belle journée a lovely dayBonne chance!

What is the proper order to form a question in French? ›

Asking questions
  • There are 3 main ways to ask a question in French: • Formal: (question word quand, où, etc) + verb + subject + ? ...
  • • Neutral: (question word) + est-ce que + subject + verb + ? Est-ce que vous connaissez Victor Hugo ? ...
  • • More informal: subject + verb (+ question word) + ? Elle travaille chez vous ?

What are the 5 elements of a sentence? ›

The five-sentence elements are subject, verb, object, complement, and adjunct (SVOCA). The subject is the performer of an action or the agent of the verb. It is usually at the beginning of a sentence, and it is generated by a noun or any of its equivalents, such as a pronoun, a noun phrase, or a noun clause.

What are the 5 basic structures of a sentence? ›

Most sentences in English are constructed using one of the following five patterns:
  • Subject–Verb.
  • Subject–Verb–Object.
  • Subject–Verb–Adjective.
  • Subject–Verb–Adverb.
  • Subject–Verb–Noun.

What are the 4 types of sentence? ›

The different types of sentences in English are:
  • Declarative Sentence.
  • Imperative Sentence.
  • Interrogative Sentence.
  • Exclamatory Sentence.

What is the most used word in France? ›

The most commonly used words in French are: Oui (yes), non (no), merci (thank you), je (I), tu/vous (you), le/la/les (the), un, une des (a, an and some), le/la/les (it, them), et (and) and mais (but).

What is the most popular French phrase? ›

Common French Greetings You Already Know
  • #1 Bonjour ! – Hello! ( the standard greeting in French) (bon jour)
  • #2 Bonsoir ! – Good evening! ( replaces bonjour in the evening) ...
  • #3 Salut ! – Hi! ( a more informal greeting) ...
  • #4 Enchanté(e) ! – Nice to meet you! ( a standard expression when meeting someone for the first time)

Why is French called 80? ›

Originally Answered: Why is the number 80 is named “quatre-vingts” (literally 4 times 20) in French? This is the Celtic way of counting, using base 20, as opposed to the Roman way of counting in base 10. It is an element of Gaulish culture that survived the Roman conquest of Gaul.

What are 10 examples of negative sentences in French? ›

Common Negative Words and Phrases
  • ça ne fait rien (it doesn't matter)
  • de rien (you're welcome) and il n'y a pas de quoi (you're welcome)
  • jamais de la vie! (never! out of the question! not on your life!)
  • pas du tout (not at all)
  • pas encore (not yet)
  • pas maintenant (not now)

How do you know if a French sentence is formal or informal? ›

When using a formal register, the word 'ne' is included in almost all negative expressions or commands, while more informal or colloquial speech often leaves the word out. For example: “I can't do it” – je ne peux pas le faire (formal) – je peux pas le faire (informal)

What is a cute girl in French? ›

Cute in French : Mignonne

You're going to use it to describe women or girls.

What is a cute French nickname? ›

10 French Love Nicknames

Note that these terms are also used to lovingly call a child, boy or girl. Mon amour – my love. Mon ange – my angel. Mon trésor – my treasure. Mon coeur – my heart.

What is the easiest French accent to understand? ›

Compared with Parisians, Southern French people speak French at a slower rate, which can make it seem easy to understand.

What is a beautiful French word? ›

Gorgeous French Words That Mean Beautiful

Just like in the English language, there are many ways to say “beautiful” in French. attrayant (masculine adjective) - attractive. belle (feminine adjective) - beautiful. charmante (feminine adjective) - charming or lovely. éblouissante (feminine adjective) - dazzling.

What is the shortest French word with all five vowels? ›

SOLUTION: The shortest French word with all five vowels is the word meaning bird.

What is the hardest French accent? ›

#1 Parisian French

Of the accents of France, the Paris accent is perhaps the hardest to nail down. And that's because Parisian French is considered “standard French” – or French without an accent.

Why do the French not have a word for 70? ›

In French, soixante (60) is the last iteration of ten to have its own word. Going higher, such as seventy is soixant dix (60-10), eighty is quatre vingt (4-20), 90 is quatre vingt dix (4-20-10). What's with this?

What is the longest word ever in French? ›

What is the longest French word? The longest French word officially recognised by the Académie française is "anticonstitutionnellement", which consists of 25 letters. It is, in other words, the longest word in the French dictionary.

What is the structure of the French language? ›

In French, this is SVO - Subject + Verb + Object. As for most Romance languages - and, indeed, English - the subject (who is doing the action?) generally comes at the beginning of the sentence.

What languages use SVO word order? ›

SVO languages include English, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, the Chinese languages and Swahili, among others. "She loves him." VSO languages include Classical Arabic, Biblical Hebrew, the Insular Celtic languages, and Hawaiian.

Do all languages have SVO word order? ›

No, they're not. And not all European languages have SVO word order: Welsh, Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Manx, Cornish, Breton, Basque, Hungarian, Turkish, are not SVO; and many European languages - for example, many of the Slavic languages, Spanish, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, and some others can be SVO but not always.

What order should I learn French verbs? ›

It's best to learn the different verb tenses gradually. They are usually tackled in the following order: present, immediate future, recent past, perfect, future, imperfect, conditional (present and past). Then come the pluperfect, subjunctive or past historic.

What are the 8 parts of speech in French? ›

Parts of Speech
  • 1) Adjectif | Adjective.
  • 2) Adverbe | Adverb.
  • 3) Article.
  • 4) Conjonction | Conjunction.
  • 5) Nom | Noun.
  • 6) Préposition | Preposition.
  • 7) Pronom | Pronoun.
  • 8) Verbe | Verb.

Where do I start with French grammar? ›

1. Begin with the Basics. Things like “Where is..,” “What is…,” “How,” “I am,” “There is,” “What” and “He has” come to mind. Having knowledge of the basic verb tenses, pronouns and question words in these everyday phrases will help you build a strong foundation for your French.

What are the types of sentences in French? ›

There are four types of sentences: statements, questions, exclamations, and commands.
...
For example:
  • Je veux y aller ! ("I want to go!")
  • J'espère que oui ! ("I hope so!")
  • Il est très beau ! ("He's very handsome!")
  • C'est une bonne idée ! ("That's a great idea!")
16 Jun 2019

What comes first in a sentence? ›

In English grammar, the rule of thumb is that the subject comes before the verb which comes before the object. This means that most of the sentences conform to the SVO word order. Note that, this is for the sentences that only have a subject, verb and object.

What is the most common word order? ›

Subject-Object-Verb (SOV)

In SOV, the verb appears at the end of the sentence, and the subject is first. It's also the most common word order in the world, and it's used across the continents. A few languages that use SOV are Ainu, Basque, Cherokee, Korean, Persian, Tibetan and Turkish, among many others.

Is English SVO or VSO? ›

VSO is the third-most common word order among the world's languages, after SOV (as in Hindi and Japanese) and SVO (as in English and Mandarin Chinese). "She him loves." "She loves him."

What are ordering words? ›

The time order words 'first', 'after that', 'then', and 'finally' help to bring the events together and tell you which ones happened first, second, third and last. Time order words help to clarify our speech and writing, to make sure that listeners and readers understand the order of events.

What is the fastest way to memorize French verbs? ›

French Verb Conjugation Tips
  1. Always memorize your french verbs with the subject pronoun that goes along with them. ...
  2. Create a spreadsheet for your verbs. ...
  3. Write everything down. ...
  4. Try changing up the order of the verbs when you memorize them. ...
  5. Record yourself saying your conjugations. ...
  6. Work with a friend!
11 Aug 2020

What is the best way to learn French quickly? ›

10 tips to learn French fast
  1. Watch films. Watching films in French with French subtitles is one of the best ways to learn. ...
  2. Learn with songs. ...
  3. Read. ...
  4. Find a partner. ...
  5. Don't be scared to try and make mistakes. ...
  6. Listen! ...
  7. Practice. ...
  8. Sign up for an intensive course.
12 Aug 2016

How can I memorize French easily? ›

10 Ways to Memorize French Vocabulary Fast
  1. Get to the Roots. Memorize words that share the same root at the same time. ...
  2. Know Your Cognates. ...
  3. Practice With Your Textbook. ...
  4. Three Is a Magic Number. ...
  5. Listen and Repeat. ...
  6. Use It in a Sentence. ...
  7. Make Associations. ...
  8. Word of the Day.
22 Sept 2021

Videos

1. French Conversation: Learn while you Sleep with 2000 words
(Learn French with FrenchPod101.com)
2. 8 Ways to Practice French Writing
(Learn French with FrenchPod101.com)
3. Essential French Words and Phrases to Sound Like a Native
(Learn French with FrenchPod101.com)
4. Introduction to French - Introduction to French Writing
(Learn French with FrenchPod101.com)
5. French Grammar in 1 Hour
(Learn French with FrenchPod101.com)
6. What Time Is It? - part 1 (French Essentials Lesson 15)
(Learn French With Alexa)
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