The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (2023)

The refugeecrisisis the greatest humanitarianissueof our generation and how we respond will define us for years to come. But with all the conflicting information out there, do we really understand it?

Let’s check the facts about refugees!

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (1)

Why do Calais migrants travel illegally?

The new Nationality and Borders Act targets people who come to the UK “illegally” and “dangerously’” – in small boats or lorries, for example.

But in practice the UK offers next to no legal ways for refugees to get here:

  • Less than 1% of refugees are able to use resettlement schemes.(1)
  • Persecuted people are not issued with identity documents, and passports get lost in war zones; so being forced to travel illegally is part and parcel of being a refugee.

The Refugee Convention bans countries from penalising refugees for travelling illegally (2)– because of the above

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (2)

Why do Calais migrants travel illegally?

The new Nationality and Borders Act targets people who have come to the UK “illegally” and “dangerously’” – in small boats or lorries, for example.

But in practice the UK offers next to no legal ways for refugees to get here:

  • Less than 1% of refugees are able to use resettlement schemes.(1)
  • Persecuted people are often not issued with identity documents, and passports get lost in war zones; so being forced to travel illegally is part and parcel of being a refugee.

The Refugee Convention bans countries from penalising refugees for travelling illegally (2)– because of the above

Find out more

Do they have a genuine need for asylum?

The majority of refugees we meet come from Afghanistan, Sudan, Eritrean, Iraq, Iran and Syria. The Global Peace Index lists the 28 most dangerous countries in the world and all of these are included – indeed, Afghanistan is ranked as number one, Syria as two, Iraq as three and South Sudan as number four; these people are fleeing the worst and most dangerous countries on this planet.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (3)

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (4)

Do they have a genuine need for asylum?

The majority of refugees we meet come from Afghanistan, Sudan, Eritrean, Iraq, Iran and Syria. The Global Peace Index lists the 28 most dangerous countries in the world and all of these are included – indeed, Afghanistan is ranked as number one, Syria as two, Iraq as three and South Sudan as number four; these people are fleeing the worst and most dangerous countries on this planet.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (5)

Why are there more men in Calais?

In the countries where they are from, such as Sudan, young men may be killed to stop them rebelling against the government or used as child soldiers. In Afghanistan, young men are often primary targets for recruitment by radical groups like ISIS and the Taliban, and in Eritrea they can be conscripted for what is effectively a life sentence. For all these reasons, boys as young as 13 and 14 have to run away from their homes and their families.

In Calais we see more women and children from countries such as Syria or Iran, but they are prioritised for social housing and not as often seen on the street.

(Video) The real facts of the refugee crisis, and what we can do | Melanie Nezer | TEDxMidAtlantic

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (6)

Why are there more men in Calais?

In the countries where they are from, such as Sudan, young men may be killed to stop them rebelling against the government or used as child soldiers. In Afghanistan, young men are often primary targets for recruitment by radical groups like ISIS and the Taliban, and in Eritrea they can be conscripted for what is effectively a life sentence. For all these reasons, boys as young as 13 and 14 have to run away from their homes and their families.

In Calais we see more women and children from countries such as Syria or Iran, but they are prioritised for social housing and not as often seen on the street.

Why Don’t Refugees Stay in the First Safe Country?

As discussed here many times more refugees do stay in the first country they arrive in rather than continue their journey onwards. However, we also see cases where people first arrive in a country such as Greece, Italy or Hungary and initially do try to settle there, but, if that country has economic problems like acute unemployment or food shortages it becomes impossible for them to survive and they end up destitute in the street.

Some therefore decide to move on to France, or further, due to a desire to become independent and contribute to society. In the long term this will benefit both the refugee and the host country.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (7)

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (8)

Why Don’t Refugees Stay in the First Safe Country?

As discussed here many times more refugees do stay in the first country they arrive in rather than continue their journey onwards. However, we also see cases where people first arrive in a country such as Greece, Italy or Hungary and initially do try to settle there, but, if that country has economic problems like acute unemployment or food shortages it becomes impossible for them to survive and they end up destitute in the street.

Some therefore decide to move on to France, or further, due to a desire to become independent and contribute to society. In the long term this will benefit both the refugee and the host country.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (9)

Can refugees claim housing benefits?

No, refugees cannot claim housing benefit in the UK. Asylum seekers are given an allowance of just£5.39per day. This must cover their food, drink, transport, clothing and toiletries; without even considering the ‘luxury’ of mobile phone credit so they can stay in touch with family back home, or a haircut, or the occasional toy for their children.

Ask yourself, “Could I live onjust £37.75for a whole week?”

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (10)

Can refugees claim housing benefits?

No, refugees cannot claim housing benefit in the UK. Asylum seekers are given an allowance of just£5.39per day. This must cover their food, drink, transport, clothing and toiletries; without even considering the ‘luxury’ of mobile phone credit so they can stay in touch with family back home, or a haircut, or the occasional toy for their children.

Ask yourself, “Could I live onjust £37.75for a whole week?”

Find out more

(Video) Explaining the Refugee Crisis

Do refugees stay forever?

Many refugees dream of returning home, where they have spent most of their lives and can be reunited with their loved ones. During 2016, the number of refugees returning home doubled.

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (11)

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (12)

Do refugees stay forever?

Many refugees dream of returning home, where they have spent most of their lives and can be reunited with their loved ones. During 2016, the number of refugees returning home doubled.

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (13)

Does Britain have space to help refugees?

It can feel like the UK is well populated, but actuallyurban areas cover just 10% of England and Wales; we may be living in crowded cities, but we are not living in a crowded and urbanised country.

So how is the other 90% of Britain’s land being used? Astonishingly, 50 per cent of the UK’s rural land is owned by less than 1% of our population. This is because of wealth disparity – the gap between the rich and the poor.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (14)

Does Britain have space to help refugees?

It can feel like the UK is well populated, but actuallyurban areas cover just 10% of England and Wales; we may be living in crowded cities, but we are not living in a crowded and urbanised country.

So how is the other 90% of Britain’s land being used? Astonishingly, 50 per cent of the UK’s rural land is owned by less than 1% of our population. This is because of wealth disparity – the gap between the rich and the poor.

Find out more

Where are they coming from?

More than half of refugees globally came from three countries: Syria, Afghanistan and South Sudan.

These are all countries that have been ravaged by war in recent years, leading to the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. It is this immediate danger to life, human rights violations, and humanitarian catastrophe that is forcibly driving refugees out of their country of origin.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (15)

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (16)

Where are they coming from?

More than half of refugees globally came from three countries: Syria, Afghanistan and South Sudan.

These are all countries that have been ravaged by war in recent years, leading to the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. It is this immediate danger to life, human rights violations, and humanitarian catastrophe that is forcibly driving refugees out of their country of origin.

Find out more

(Video) What does it mean to be a refugee? - Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (17)

Is Britain’s asylum system tough enough?

Yes. The UK asylum system is strictly controlled and complex. It is very difficult to get asylum as the decision-making process is extremely tough and many people’s claims are rejected.

It is true that initial Home Office decision-making remains poor, but the appeals process provides a significant control. In 2016, the courts overturned Home Office decisions in 41% of asylum appeals.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (18)

Is Britain’s asylum system tough enough?

Yes. The UK asylum system is strictly controlled and complex. It is very difficult to get asylum as the decision-making process is extremely tough and many people’s claims are rejected.

It is true that initial Home Office decision-making remains poor, but the appeals process provides a significant control. In 2016, the courts overturned Home Office decisions in 41% of asylum appeals.

Find out more

Why do refugees have smartphones?

Refugees have mobiles phones as they are the last lifeline back to the families they have left behind, who may still be in danger, and their primary hope of getting to a secure place of shelter. They use them to update their families on their perilous journeys, and to try to make sense of their route in an alien and often dangerous context.

Making calls to other continents is too expensive and in third world countries the lines are unstable, so they need smartphones to use free WIFI networks and apps like WhatsApp and Viber.

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (19)

Why do refugees have smartphones?

Refugees have mobiles phones as they are the last lifeline back to the families they have left behind, who may still be in danger, and their primary hope of getting to a secure place of shelter. They use them to update their families on their perilous journeys, and to try to make sense of their route in an alien and often dangerous context.

Making calls to other continents is too expensive and in third world countries the lines are unstable, so they need smartphones to use free WIFI networks and apps like WhatsApp and Viber.

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (21)

Do all refugees want to come to the UK?

More often than not, they don’t; the idea that all refugees try to get to the UK is a common, and false, misconception.

Sweden and Hungary, which both have much smaller populations than the UK, have taken several times more refugees per head of population than the UK has.

(Video) 5 Staggering Facts about the Global Refugee Crisis

Watch the video

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (22)

Do all refugees want to come to the UK?

More often than not, they don’t; the idea that all refugees try to get to the UK is a common, and false, misconception.

Sweden and Hungary, which both have much smaller populations than the UK, have taken several times more refugees per head of population than the UK has.

Watch the video

Where are most refugees currently hosted?

Most of the world’s refugees are currently hosted in the world’s poorest countries. In 2016, developing regions hosted 84% of the world’s refugees, according to the UN’s Refugee Agency.

Moreover, the very least developed countries are stepping up their efforts, hosting a growing proportion in 2016 of 28% of refugees worldwide.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (23)

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (24)

Where are most refugees currently hosted?

Most of the world’s refugees are currently hosted in the world’s poorest countries. In 2016, developing regions hosted 84% of the world’s refugees, according to the UN’s Refugee Agency.

Moreover, the very least developed countries are stepping up their efforts, hosting a growing proportion in 2016 of 28% of refugees worldwide.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (25)

What is a refugee/asylum seeker?

Refugees are people fleeing conflict or persecution; it is too dangerous for them to return home, and they need sanctuary elsewhere. If these people don’t get asylum there are potentially deadly consequences.

An asylum seeker is someone who has arrived in a country and asked for asylum. Until they receive a decision as to whether or not they are a refugee, they are known as an asylum seeker.

Find out more

The Refugee Crisis | Understand Refugee Facts | Care4Calais (26)

What is a refugee/asylum seeker?

Refugees are people fleeing conflict or persecution; it is too dangerous for them to return home, and they need sanctuary elsewhere. If these people don’t get asylum there are potentially deadly consequences.

An asylum seeker is someone who has arrived in a country and asked for asylum. Until they receive a decision as to whether or not they are a refugee, they are known as an asylum seeker.

Find out more

(Video) Understanding the Refugee Crisis in Europe, Syria, and around the World

FAQs

What are 5 facts about refugees? ›

10 Eye-Opening Facts To Share On World Refugee Day
  • There are 79.5 million people around the world who have been forcibly displaced—the highest figure ever recorded. ...
  • About 1% of the world's population is displaced. ...
  • 50% of the world's refugees are children. ...
  • Developing countries host more than 85% of the world's refugees.
1 Jun 2021

What are the 3 major factors that contribute to a refugee crisis? ›

Causes. Causes for the crisis of the refugees can include war and civil war, human rights violations, environment and climate issues, and economic hardship.

What is the best solution to the refugee crisis? ›

1. Opening up safe routes to sanctuaryfor refugees is one important solution. That means allowing people to reunite with their relatives, and giving refugees visas so they don't have to spend their life savings and risk drowningto reach safety. 2.It also means resettling all refugees who need it.

What are 3 rights that refugees are entitled to? ›

Rights of integration

the right at Article 3 not to discriminate between refugees, meaning that some refugees may not be treated worse than others. the right at Article 4 to freedom of religion and religious education of their children.

What are 2 facts about refugees? ›

The UN resettlement system prioritises asylum seekers for resettlement according to considered needs and situations of vulnerability, rather than waiting time. In 2021, there were 27.1 million refugees worldwide. 21 countries resettled 57,500 of these globally, down from 107,800 in 2019.

What are the 3 types of refugees? ›

Types of Refugees in Human Rights

Refugee. Asylum Seeker. Internally displaced person.

What rights do refugees have? ›

Refugees share the same human rights as legal residents, including: Freedom of opinion and expression. Freedom of thought, conscience, and religion. Freedom from torture or degrading treatment.

How are refugees affected? ›

Before being forced to flee, refugees may experience imprisonment, torture, loss of property, malnutrition, physical assault, extreme fear, rape and loss of livelihood.

Are refugees legal? ›

The right to seek asylum was incorporated into international law following the atrocities of World War II. Congress adopted key provisions of the Geneva Refugee Convention (including the international definition of a refugee) into U.S. immigration law when it passed the Refugee Act of 1980.

How do refugees survive? ›

Refugees often live in crowded or makeshift shelters without proper water or sanitation systems: tent settlements, chicken coops, abandoned buildings — wherever they can find relative safety.

How can we take care of refugees? ›

Ways to help right now:
  1. Help the IRC support refugee families in crisis with a donation: Donate now.
  2. Take action. ...
  3. Look for IRC volunteer opportunities assisting refugees in the U.S.
  4. Sponsor a refugee family.
  5. Find out other ways to support the IRC's refugee resettlement work across the U.S.: See where we work.

Who is called refugee? ›

Refugee. Refugees are persons who are outside their country of origin for reasons of feared persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or other circumstances that have seriously disturbed public order and, as a result, require international protection.

What do refugees most need? ›

Need for healthcare: a lot of refugees are tired or exhausted and sometimes distressed when they arrive. They may also be ill due to the unhealthy conditions experienced during their journey. 2. Welfare needs in terms both of protection and a warm meal, a bed, access to a bathroom, new clothes, rest etc.

Who Cannot be a refugee? ›

Responsible persons are those who commit, instigate, aide in the commission of a particular crime, as well as those found to have participated in a joint criminal enterprise. Such persons cannot be invoke the right to family reunification either.

What challenges do refugees face? ›

The most common issues among refugees are depression and anxiety, but more serious issues like post-traumatic stress disorder can also be found in populations affected by conflict, violence, and persecution. Mental health is health, regardless of who you are or where you live.

Who was the first refugee? ›

The word refugee comes from French and was first used in the modern context following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, which sent the Protestant Huguenots to flee the religious persecution by the French King Louis XIV.

How many refugees are left? ›

27.1 million refugees. 53.2 million internally displaced people.

How many children are refugees? ›

Half of the global refugee population, nearly 13 million, are children below the age of 18.

What is the biggest refugee? ›

The Syrian refugee crisis remains the largest humanitarian and development crisis in the world. Nearly 7 million Syrians are internally displaced, and 6.6 million have been forced to seek safety as refugees in Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan and beyond.

Where do refugees go to? ›

Türkiye hosts the largest number of refugees, with 3.7 million people.
...
Welcome to UNHCR's Refugee Population Statistics Database.
Syrian Arab Republic6.8 million
Ukraine5.4 million
Afghanistan2.8 million
South Sudan2.4 million
1 more row

Can refugees leave the country? ›

If you have refugee status and want to travel outside the United States, you will need to obtain a Refugee Travel Document in order to return to the United States. If you do not obtain a Refugee Travel Document in advance of departure, you may be unable to re-enter the United States.

Who helped the refugees? ›

The UN agency that helps refugees is UNHCR (also known as the UN Refugee Agency), which emerged in the wake of World War II to help Europeans displaced by that conflict. UNHCR was established on December 14, 1950 by the UN General Assembly with a three-year mandate to complete its work and then disband.

What benefits do refugees bring? ›

As they find their footing, refugees contribute significant tax revenue, stimulate the economy, raise productivity, improve local worker wages, boost innovation, and often generate international trade because of their connections to various countries.

Who decides who is a refugee? ›

The U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP)

UNHCR determines if an individual qualifies as a refugee and, if so, works toward the best possible durable solution: safe return to the home country, local integration, or permanent resettlement in a third country.

How do refugees work? ›

As defined by U.S. law and the 1951 Refugee Convention, refugees are migrants seeking entry from a third country who are able to demonstrate that they have been persecuted, or have reason to fear persecution, on the basis of one of five “protected grounds”: race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership ...

How can countries help refugees? ›

Offer work visas or employment

As well as surviving and supporting their families, it helps people maintain their self-respect and independence, and to integrate in a new community. Many countries offer refugees work permits.

How human rights affect refugees? ›

“Human rights violations are a major factor in causing the flight of refugees as well as an obstacle to their safe and voluntary return home. Safeguarding human rights in countries of origin is therefore critical both for the prevention and for the solution of refugee problems.

Do refugees return home? ›

Many refugees do not return; or they 'self-return' spontaneously, but often doing so individually or in groups all at different times of their choosing, or more, confusingly, moving back and forth from country of refuge to country of origin as security and livelihood conditions dictate.

What are refugees kids? ›

A refugee is a person who has been forced to leave their country in order to escape war, persecution or natural disaster.

Do refugees stay permanently? ›

If you are a refugee, you are required by law to apply for lawful permanent resident status 1 year after being admitted to the United States as a refugee. File Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status.

Why do refugees need water? ›

Safe water is essential to life and health. People can survive longer without food than without water. Thus the provision of water demands immediate attention from the start of a refugee emergency. The aim is to assure availability of enough water to allow sufficient distribution and to ensure that it is safe to drink.

Why do refugees leave? ›

Refugees are people who have been forced to flee their home country because of war, persecution, or violence. To be granted refugee status, they must establish a well-founded fear of danger or of persecution due to race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social or ethnic group.

What causes refugees to leave? ›

War and ethnic, tribal and religious violence are leading causes of refugees fleeing their countries. 69% of those displaced across borders come from just five countries: Syria, Venezuela, Afghanistan, South Sudan and Myanmar.

Why is it important to protect refugees? ›

If other countries do not let them in or protect them, they may be condemned to an intolerable situation where their basic rights, security and even their lives are in danger.

Do refugees get clean water? ›

All refugees have the basic right to access safe water of sufficient quality and quantity and to access hygienic sanitation services, both at home and at institutions including schools and health facilities.

How can students help refugees? ›

Provide kids with food and water if they don't have it. Protect children and families from people who are fighting around them. Take care of kids who have had to leave their homes. Watch out for them, and help them find safe new homes.

When did the refugees start? ›

In the mid-19th Century, revolutions across Europe in France, Germany, Italy and the Austro-Hungarian led to high numbers of exiles seeking refuge. These refugees were politically active and included those seeking independence from the autocratic imperial regimes of central and eastern Europe.

Who is a famous refugee? ›

Albert Einstein – One of the world's most famous scientists, German-Jewish refugee. Alexander Grothendieck – Mathematician, German-Jewish refugee. Robert Fano – Physicist, Italian-Jewish refugee. Ugo Fano – Physicist, Italian-Jewish refugee.

What does refugees stand for? ›

The definition of a refugee is someone who has been forced to leave their country in order to escape war and persecution. They are unable to return home until conditions are safe for them again. Refugees are protected by international law under the 1951 United Nations Refugee Convention, of which the UK is a signatory.

Do refugees need food? ›

The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) reports that 80% of the world's displaced people are in locations suffering from acute food insecurity and malnutrition [8].

Who treats refugees Best? ›

The Four “Best” Countries for Refugee Resettlement
  • 1) Germany. The huge migration of refugees seeking asylum in Germany in autumn of 2015 has dominated the news for months. ...
  • 2) Sweden. ...
  • 3) The United States. ...
  • 4) Brazil.
3 Nov 2015

What food do refugees get? ›

Often the refugees will be provided with their staple food as a carbohydrate e.g.Rice, mealie meal, bread, oats or couscous. Unfortunately in a refugee camp, fresh fruit and vegetables are very difficult to get. For this reason, many refugees suffer from malnutrition.

Do refugees have SIN? ›

If you are approved for a work permit, you can apply for a Social Insurance Number (SIN). As a refugee claimant, you do not need to pay a fee to apply for a work permit or a SIN.

Can a refugee get a SIN number? ›

If you are a refugee claimant or a temporary resident, you will get a SIN with an expiration date.

What country has the most refugees? ›

1. Syria — 6.8 million refugees and asylum-seekers. Most Syrians who are refugees because of the Syrian civil war remain in the Middle East. Turkey hosts about 3.8 million, the largest number of refugees hosted by any country in the world.

How long do refugees live in camps? ›

In protracted refugee situations - where mass displacement has affected a country for five years or more -, refugees may spend years and even decades living in camps and it is common to have entire generations growing up in the camps.

What is unique about refugee? ›

A refugee is a person who is outside his or her country of nationality and can't return due to a well-founded fear of persecution because of his or her race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group.

What 5 countries do most refugees come from? ›

More than 7 in 10 of all refugees under UNHCR's mandate and other people in need of international protection come from just five countries. Türkiye hosts the largest number of refugees, with 3.7 million people.
...
Welcome to UNHCR's Refugee Population Statistics Database.
Türkiye3.7 million
Uganda1.5 million
3 more rows
27 Oct 2022

How many refugees exist? ›

By the end of 2021, 89.3 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, violence or human rights violations. This includes: 27.1 million refugees. 53.2 million internally displaced people.

Do refugees have rights? ›

They have the same rights as everyone else, plus special or specific protections including: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 14), which states that everyone has the right to seek and enjoy asylum from persecution in other countries.

How did refugee start? ›

The Syrian refugee crisis is the result of a March 2011 violent government crackdown on public demonstrations in support of a group of teenagers who were arrested for anti-government graffiti in the southern town of Daraa.

How do refugee survive? ›

Refugees often live in crowded or makeshift shelters without proper water or sanitation systems: tent settlements, chicken coops, abandoned buildings — wherever they can find relative safety.

What do refugees need most? ›

The UNHCR Results Framework defines basic needs in terms of access to basic services and assistance in health, nutrition, WASH, food, shelter, energy, education, as well as domestic items and specialised services for people with specific needs.

What do refugees want most? ›

They want to work and they want to contribute to our communities. Just like us, they seek a life of dignity, freedom and security.

How can we help refugees? ›

How can I help refugees and people seeking asylum?
  1. Sign our Every Refugee Matters pledge. We want to see a more compassionate way to support refugees. ...
  2. Take part in Miles for Refugees. This June, every mile counts. ...
  3. Volunteer to help refugees. ...
  4. Use our teaching resources. ...
  5. Buy products designed by refugees.

How many refugees are children? ›

Half of the global refugee population, nearly 13 million, are children below the age of 18.

Why do people become refugees? ›

People become refugees for many reasons, including war, oppression, natural disasters, and climate change. Most refugee laws are based on a 1951 United Nations document, the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. The Convention was created to deal with the large number of people displaced by World War II.

When did refugee crisis start? ›

The Syrian refugee crisis is the humanitarian emergency resulting from the Syrian civil war that began March 15, 2011. Conflict in Syria has exacted a heavy toll on hundreds of thousands of children and their families.

Who is responsible for refugees? ›

The UN agency that helps refugees is UNHCR (also known as the UN Refugee Agency), which emerged in the wake of World War II to help Europeans displaced by that conflict. UNHCR was established on December 14, 1950 by the UN General Assembly with a three-year mandate to complete its work and then disband.

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5. Images of the refugee crisis | DW Documentary
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